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Q&A on Specialty Hard to Fit Contacts

Dr. Shane Answers All Of Your Questions On Specialty Hard To Fit Contacts in Rockville Centre, New York

blond putting in contact lenses with severe astigmatism in Rockville Centre New York

Keratoconusillustration keratoconus

Q: What is Keratoconus?
A: Keratoconus is the condition when the cornea (the front surface of the eye) becomes more and more distorted as the patient ages. As the cornea changes shape this will cause a significant decrease in the patient’s vision and ability to see clearly. Unfortunately glasses usually do not correct keratoconus sufficiently and contact lenses usually provide the best attainable vision for this particular patient.

Q: Are some people more likely to develop it?
A: The individuals more likely to develop keratoconus are usually those individuals that have a family member with it. Also there is a strong prevalence in people of Eastern European descent.

Q: How would someone know if they have it?
A: An individual won’t know that they have keratoconus but some of the symptoms they may experience is a decrease in their vision that soft contact lenses or eyeglasses just cant correct their vision efficiently anymore.

Q: How do eye doctors diagnose Keratoconus?
A: Most Eye doctors are able to diagnose keratoconus as a result of the sophisticated instrumentation (corneal topographer). The corneal topographer will display a map of the patients cornea that will definitely diagnose keratoconus.

Q: What consequences can occur if Keratoconus is left untreated?
A: If keratoconus is left untreated the patient will slowly lose some of their vision and will state that their vision just becomes more blurry with each passing year.

Q: How do you treat Keratoconus?
A: There are many different modalities of treating keratoconus. It can be treated sometimes by eyeglasses, surgery but the most efficient way to treat keratoconus is with special contact lenses.

Q: Should I see an eye doctor that is specialized in hard to fit contacts?
A:
In order to attain the best vision for a patient with keratoconus would be to see a contact lens specialist that is very familiar with the visual needs of these individuals. Contact lens companies are routinely changing designs of their contact lenses and the contact lens specialist will have access and familiarity with these new innovative designs.

specialty contact fitting slideshow: Do you need a practice with experience in specialty contact lens fittings? Keratoconus, severe dry eye, post-op or LASIK complications, need scleral lenses, needs specialty rigid gas permeable lenses, astigmatism

Hard To Fit Contacts

Q: What is a hard to fit contact lens patient?
A:
Individuals with keratoconus May be considered hard to fit due to the distortion of the cornea. As a result of the distorted cornea normal soft contact lenses typically don’t work for patients with keratoconus.

Q: What are scleral contact lenses?
A: A scleral lens is usually about 17 mm of his design that vaults over the cornea and land slightly outside of the iris(the colored portion of the eye). As a result of landing on the Sclera (the white portion of the eye), these lenses are more comfortable than traditional contact lenses.

Q: Are scleral contact lenses comfortable?
A: A matter-of-fact these lenses are usually much more comfortable than traditional lenses. So much so that dry eye patients prefer these contact lenses over any others because moisture is trapped between the contact lens and the eye making lens wear them much more comfortable.

Q: Who is a good candidate for scleral lenses?
A: Scleral lenses have had the most advancement in the contact lens industry for those patients suffering from keratoconus.

Q: At what age can a child begin wearing Scleral Lenses?
A: Scleral lenses can be worn by children and adults of all ages.

Q: How often do I need to replace scleral lenses?
A: Scleral lenses are typically replaced every 1-2 years.

scleral lenses slideshow: Scleral Lenses - Freedom is within reach; contact lenses can work for you

Scleral Lenses

Q: What are scleral contact lenses?
A: A scleral lens is usually about 17 mm of his design that vaults over the cornea and land slightly outside of the iris(the colored portion of the eye). As a result of landing on the Sclera (the white portion of the eye), these lenses are more comfortable than traditional contact lenses.

Q: Are scleral contact lenses comfortable?
A: A matter-of-fact these lenses are usually much more comfortable than traditional lenses. So much so that dry eye patients prefer these contact lenses over any others because moisture is trapped between the contact lens and the eye making lens wear them much more comfortable.

Q: Who is a good candidate for scleral lenses?
A: Scleral lenses have had the most advancement in the contact lens industry for those patients suffering from keratoconus.

Q: At what age can a child begin wearing scleral Lenses?
A: Scleral lenses can be worn by children and adults of all ages.

Q: How often do I need to replace scleral lenses?
A: Scleral lenses are typically replaced every 1-2 years.

A Childhood Disease Worth Preventing | Nicholas Despotidis | TEDxAsburyPark

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